News in pediatric oncology

Hospital celebrates ‘very brave’ Quebec toddler who finished lengthy chemotherapy

While other toddlers her age are focused on learning to walk and talk, two-year-old Maddison Chavez Espinosa’s milestones look little different.

On Monday, for example, she was cheered on by the oncology department at Sainte-Justine Children’s Hospital to celebrate finishing chemotherapy. Maddison has spent most of her short life in hospital, learning to cope with surgeries, and numerous treatments, all because of a brain tumor.

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Largest international study of rare childhood brain cancer shows early molecular diagnosis and aggressive therapy could improve patient outcomes

The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) researchers have published the first clinical management guidelines for patients with a rare and aggressive childhood brain tumour, based on a study of the largest cohort of patients with ETMR in the world. The study was published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health on September 29, 2021.

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New research shows children with blood cancer at low risk of severe COVID-19 disease

Research published in the British Medical Journal’s Archives of Disease in Childhood has shown that children with haematological malignancies (blood cancers) are at no higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease than children with other types of cancer. Previously published research from this project had shown that overall, children with cancer were at no higher risk of severe disease as a result of infection by the SARS-CoV2 virus than healthy children.

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Can leukemia in children with Down syndrome be prevented? Princess Margaret Scientists reveal a new target that suggests it can

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IMAGE: DR. ELVIN WAGENBLAST, POST-DOCTORAL FELLOW AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET CANCER CENTRE, UNIVERSITY HEALTH NETWORK, IS THE FIRST AUTHOR. view more

CREDIT: UHN

For the first time, Princess Margaret researchers have mapped out where and how leukemia begins and develops in infants with Down syndrome in preclinical models, paving the way to potentially prevent this cancer in the future.

Children with Down syndrome have a 150-fold increased risk of developing myeloid leukemia within the first five years of their life. Yet the mechanism by which the extra copy of chromosome 21 predisposes to leukemia remains unclear.

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